Blog

Team Picks from BDNY 2017

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Now in its eighth year, Boutique Design New York (BDNY) is the leading trade fair and conference for the hospitality design industry, serving the eastern United States, Canada, and Europe. Take a look at some of the team's favorites from this year's BDNY show! This slideshow requires JavaScript.

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Barns of Greenport

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“The idea I had for the design of this house was a more contemporary design. I think of myself as a contemporary architect so I originally started designing the house as a combination of flat roof volumes. As I got closer to the reality of actually building and submitting the house to Greenport Village for approval, I realized that I might have a problem being in the historic district. Flat roofs are not historic and my assessment after talking to a number of the townsfolk was that it would not be approved. Trying to reconcile my contemporary design aesthetic with the historic requirements I turned to historic barns which I had always admired for their utilitarian beauty. I have a great book, Barns of Cape Cod by Schiffer that had some really beautiful barns that I used as inspiration. My…

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From CityRealty.com:The Ultimate Map of NYC’s Passive House Movement

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With buildings consuming the bulk of the city’s energy and emitting most of its greenhouse gases, it’s common sense that cutting inefficiencies here would be a primary focus in fighting climate change. Following President Donald Trump’s decision to pull the country out of the Paris Climate Agreement, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced a pioneering initiative that would force thousands of aging buildings to become more energy efficient by 2030 or face stiff penalties. If approved by the City Council, the executive order would make the city the first in the nation to agree to a Paris Agreement-compatible action plan that would effectively make the Big Apple a leader in reducing greenhouse-gas emissions. See the full list here.

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Passive House: Fresh Air by Design

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My first reaction after learning that a passive house is virtually sealed from the exterior was that it would feel claustrophobic. How can you live in a house that is completely sealed up?   The answer is you don’t in a passive house. The science of the passive house incorporates a constant flow of fresh air into the house while exhausting an equal amount of inside air. The device used is either an ERV (Energy Recovery Ventilation unit) or an HRV (Heat Recovery Ventilation unit) depending on your climate.  These units let the air that is being exhausted exchange their heat/cool or energy to the air coming in. Some of these units are over 90% efficient. Typically fresh air is introduced to the bedrooms and living rooms and the air is exhausted from the bathrooms and kitchen. In the Greenport Passive House project, we…

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Upper West Side Townhouse Designed by Turett is on the Market

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Positioned on a prime, picture-perfect, tree-lined West Side block, just a few feet from Central Park, this gut-renovated and rebuilt Renaissance Revival 8,564 sf townhouse beauty delivers on every level. Originally built in 1910 and designed by architect George M. Walgrove, this classic turn of the century home, noteworthy for its distinctive rooftop turret, has been painstaking transformed through a years-long renovation into a mansion-scaled residence with elevator access to all seven floors, perfectly appointed for modern-day living, designed by noted architect Wayne Turett.   See the full listing here. 

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Turett New York Architect

Follow The Turett Collaborative on Instagram

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Follow The Turett Collaborative on Instagram and see more behinds the scenes content from this New York City design studio. LINK

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Wayne Turett’s Dream House

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A few years ago I started to see more information on Passive Houses in a number of architectural journals. The concept was simple, design a house that was very well insulated and sealed allowing very little infiltration that would reduce the demand for heating and cooling. That was the way I understood it. Perhaps I oversimplified it in my mind.  Unlike LEED, which takes many other factors in consideration, Passive House was a much more simple recipe for a very efficient house. In this journal, I will attempt to tell you my experiences as I realize a long held dream of building my own Passive House to live in. A little background: my wife, Jessica and I purchased a property in Greenport, on the North Fork of eastern Long Island, a couple of years ago with the purpose of building…

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Passive House Construction and Tapes

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Tapes have become an essential component in building today, especially with Passive House projects. Since Passive House standards require an airtight building envelope, not using tapes is not an option. Every Passive House project utilizes something called the ‘Air Barrier’ which uses one or many layers of sheathing and tapes on the structure to prevent inefficient air leaks. Tapes seal the air barrier and help to stop air leakage so that Passive House projects can stay airtight and energy efficient. It is essential to include a line item for tape in construction estimates for Passive House projects.  Many different types of tapes are used in the construction of the Greenport Passive House by Turett. Zip Tape to tape all seams of the Zip Sheathing, Aluminum faced tape to seal the polyisocyanurate insulation seams, Blueskin Butyl flashing tape in the window…

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Estimating Passive House Construction Costs

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Passive House projects have slightly different materials used in the construction, therefore costs are not always the same as conventional housing projects. In the Greenport Passive House, the air barrier is achieved using Zip Sheathing and Zip tape. Exterior insulation of polyisocyanurate (4" walls, 6" roof) and 1" wood furring is attached to the Zip Sheathing using long structural screws. This is unique to Passive House projects because the insulation used tends to be thicker than on a conventional house. In the end, over 5,000 screws were used to attach furring and insulation to the outside of the vapor barrier sheathing. The screws alone cost over $6,000. Installing insulation over the air barrier. Furring strips attached over the insulation. Over 5,000 screws were used in this project. Installing the cedar shiplap siding Shiplap cedar siding installation shot.

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The Greenport Passive House is on Schedule

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